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OKBet News: Lydia de Vega’s final race ends in tears and tributes

August 14, 2022
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OKBet News: Lydia de Vega’s final race ends in tears and tributes
OKBet News: Lydia de Vega's final race ends in tears and tributes

Lydia de Vega changed what it meant to be a track-and-field star. She had long strides like a gazelle, was determined to be great, and had the charm of a country girl.

She was the Philippines’ first genuine megastar on the track, and her accomplishments are still unmatched today, even though she was at her best more than 30 years ago.

De Vega ran her last race, the one for her life. She passed after a long fight with breast cancer, leaving a grateful nation in tears as they said goodbye to a legend who was this country’s pride for so many years.

Born in Meycauayan, Bulacan, a day after Christmas in 1964, De Vega shot to fame when she won gold in the 200 and 400-meter races at the 1981 Southeast Asian (SEA) Games in Manila. Her winning times smashed Asian Games records.

That was the beginning of great things, a love affair with a country that wanted to love athletes who didn’t play basketball.

National Olympic Committees

Abraham “Bambol” Tolentino, the president of the PH Olympic Committee (POC), and the heads of many other countries national Olympic committees (NOCs) also said they were sad about De Vega’s death.

On Thursday, Tolentino said, “It’s another sad day for Philippine sports. We lost a great icon, but she left a mark on the hearts of everyone she inspired.”

In a message to Tolentino, Brunei NOC president Prince Haji Sufri Bolkiah said, “On behalf of Brunei Darussalam NOC, I would like to send our sincere condolences. To the Philippines NOC and the late Lydia de Vega family.”

“Brother President Tolentino, we send our deepest condolences to Lydia de Vega’s family and all of the Philippines NOC,” said Raja Sapta Oktohari, the president of the Indonesia Olympic Committee. “May she sleep peacefully.”

“We were sad to hear this news. The head of state of the National Olympic Committee of Thailand, Gen. Prawit Wongsuwan, wrote, “On behalf of NOCT, please accept our deepest condolences to the POC. And the family of the late Lydia de Vega.” “Her legacy is still going strong. May she sleep peacefully.”

De Vega’s most significant wins came in the 100-meter dash at the 1982 Asian Games in New Delhi, where she beat P. T. Usha, a favorite from her home country, and in Seoul four years later. She was the fastest woman in Asia because she won the 100-meter and 200-meter races at the Asian Olympiad in 1983 and 1987.

When Muros-Posadas thought about the last time she saw De Vega at Makati Medical Center, she broke down in tears. The two met during the 2019 SEA Games Opening Ceremonies, which honored the Philippines’ past sports stars. But Muros-Posadas didn’t know De Vega was sick until that hospital visit.

‘Diay” is Lydia De Vega’s nickname

“As I looked at her, I asked the Lord if it was true that Diay (De Vega’s nickname) was the one lying,” Muros-Posadas said, sobbing and barely audible. “I couldn’t believe it when I saw her in that condition. Behind a glass wall, I told her, “This can’t happen to you. You’re Lydia de Vega, my hero.”

Muros-Posadas has accepted it, and she prays that her best friend will find peace for the rest of her life.

“I still want to believe that I didn’t see Diay there,” she said. “But things are as they are. The Lord has plans for every one of us. I can only take comfort in the fact that she’s no longer in pain.”

After her daughter Stephanie said that Diay’s fight with breast cancer began in 2018. The rest of the country probably felt the same. Even for Asia’s former sprint queen, it was harrowing that the disease spread to her bones and brain.

In the middle of the conversation, Muros-Posadas reminded the Inquirer of how outstanding De Vega was and how hard she and the other track and field team members used to work.

Muros-Posadas has accepted it, and she prays that her best friend will find peace for the rest of her life.

“I still want to believe that I didn’t see Diay there,” she said. “But things are as they are. The Lord has plans for every one of us. I can only take comfort in the fact that she’s no longer in pain.”

Diay’s fight with breast cancer began in 2018

After her daughter Stephanie said that Diay’s fight with breast cancer began in 2018, the rest of the country probably felt the same. Even for Asia’s former sprint queen, it has harrowing that the disease spread to her bones and brain.

In the middle of the conversation, Muros-Posadas reminded the Inquirer of how outstanding De Vega had and how hard she and the other track and field team members used to work.

“Before I moved to Manila, I had only heard her name on the radio or read about her. “She became my idol right away,” Muros-Posadas said. “I even slept at their house for a while and found out who she had.

“She gave it everything she had. I knew in my heart then, and I still know now, that I didn’t make a mistake by looking up to her.

Many Filipinos will agree with Elma, especially those who were glue to their seats and cheering for De Vega. When the girl from Meycauayan was beating up on foreign opponents.

Her races were short-lived by their very nature at age 57.

Lydia de Vega, a Filipino hero who was unbeatable on the racetrack, has finished her last race and gone home. Keep updated here at OKBet Trending for more updated news and event in different sports.

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